With all the buzz surrounding NFTs (and the millions of dollars being spent on JPG images and virtual cats) it’s hard to know what’s real or just hype.

SNL captures the confusion (and surprisingly many salient facts) about NFTs in its timely sketch “What the hell are NFTs?”:

Kidding aside, as you peel back the layers, it becomes increasingly clear that NFTs are more than just hype. In fact, NFT technology may be new, important building block of the internet. Even in its earliest days, NFT technology is already manifesting in ways to fundamentally reshape how commerce is conducted…


We just surveyed 500 Millennial women about how they shop for fashion, online and in-store. In particular, we wanted to understand how they used social media and online influencers to discover and buy fashion. The standout finding for us is that a slight majority (52%) of Millennials said they trust influencers less than they used to.

We plan a more detailed survey to better understand this growing trust gap, but based on our experience working with influencers and shoppers over the past few years, we can offer some preliminary thoughts and observations on why this is happening and what marketers…


When our team first adopted Slack back in 2014, we felt that team chat had finally been “solved.” Prior tools we had used such as Skype and GChat were designed for individuals not companies, and using them for team communication felt cumbersome. Slack gave us centralized team management, granular notifications controls, and importantly, public and private discussion channels. We’ve been happily Slacking ever since.

Email, on the other hand, has gone in the other direction. Over time, email seems to have become less useful as an internal communications tool. With inboxes flooded with unsolicited emails (not to mention social notifications…


Consumers are becoming savvier at tuning out ads, and marketers are scrambling to find new ways to reach them. At the same time, people — especially teens and millennials — are becoming increasingly engaged with online influencers.

Some statistics illustrate where we’re headed:

  • 32% of internet users will use an ad blocker in 2017 (eMarketer)
  • 90% of consumers trust peer recommendations. Only 33% trust ads. (Nielsen)
  • Teens say that their favorite YouTubers understand them better than their friends (Google)

No wonder 75 percent of marketers are now using some form of influencer marketing. Influencer marketing represents a new pull method…


The most significant development coming out of Apple’s iPhone 7 announcement was not the outgoing analog audio jack (an obvious move in line with Apple’s forward-thinking design philosophy), but rather the incoming AirPods and, in particular, their unprecedented capability as a voice input device. The AirPods, which one can assume will serve as a great audio listening device, will likely have far greater impact as the first viable interface for using Apple’s (long-maligned) voice assistant, Siri.

Mobile voice assistants like Siri and Google Now, although much improved, have continued to face two hurdles to becoming truly viable, everyday usable experiences…


From Amazon’s Alexa to Google’s Allo, see where the industry stands today.

Two trends — the exploding popularity of mobile messaging apps and advances in artificial intelligenceare coinciding to enable a new generation of tools that enable brands to communicate with customers in powerful new ways at reduced cost. Retailers and technology firms are experimenting with chatbots, powered by a combination of machine learning, natural language processing, and live operators, to provide customer service, sales support, and other commerce-related functions.

Chris Messina of Uber recently coined the term “conversational commerce” to describe this movement, which he defines as:

…utilizing chat, messaging, or other natural language interfaces (i.e. voice) to interact…


As brands hop onto Snapchat, curate their Instagram feeds, and wrestle with Facebook’s algorithm, Twitter has largely fallen out of favor with marketers and brands over the past year. In a double-digit-growth industry, Twitter actually showed a quarterly decline in monthly active users at the end of 2015, dealing a major blow to the brand’s cachet and raising doubts about its viability as a mainstream social platform.

Where did Twitter go wrong? Popular with tech influencers and journalists, Twitter never addressed some of its core product usability problems that alienated more mainstream users. …


After each Apple event, people tend to fall into one of two camps — either “Apple has completely lost its mojo” or “OMG that was the best Apple announcement ever.” While its true that it may be hard to top Steve Jobs’ original iPhone announcement in terms of raw disruption factor, the fact is, the rate of innovation coming out of Apple and other companies is not only higher than ever, it’s accelerating. …


Reports are in that Google will be adding “buy” buttons directly to its search results pages, starting with sponsored shopping results page listings. These buy buttons will lead users to a Google page where they can customize options, enter shipping and billing information, and complete their purchase. If this sounds a lot like what Amazon does, its not a coincidence. Amazon is one of the few companies to have beaten Google at the search game, specifically when it comes to product search. What app do you use to search for something to buy? …


Twitter just announced a miserable quarter. Ad rates are weak, reflecting the company’s inability to extract premium rates from its ad units.

Meanwhile, Facebook continues to dominate with its native news feed ads, particularly on mobile.

As it wows Wall Street, Facebook is also quietly working with its news and video content publishers to bring more of their content (full articles, video uploads) natively onto their platform. Why? Because Facebook understands that the future of advertising is native. Native advertising is about integrating ads closely with the content your users are coming to consume on your platform. …

Michael Quoc

Founder of demand.io. We create new ways to shop.

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